Neil Young – Peace Trail

Neil Young – Peace Trail

neil-young-peace-trail

The new Neil Young album includes one sure-fire instant classic, some could-be-great protest songs, and only a couple of tracks that don’t quite fit. That’s not bad for another in-and-out-of-studio-in the-wink-of-an-eye release. The sure-fire instant classic is the title track. It’s the equivalent of ‘Goin’ Home’ from Are You Passionate? The track that lifts the rest of the album to a better place. It’s also a track that could be played in plenty of different ways live, from a scorching guitar-led Crazy Horse/POTR track right through to a more reflective acoustic solo ballad. That’s the sign of a great Neil Young song. Aside from ‘Peace Trail’ itself, there’s also a bunch of could-be-great tracks. In fact, there’s a really powerful protest album trying to fight its way out of this set of songs. Standing Rock is a common reference point, making the album a sort of The Monsanto Years for the Dakotas. But there are other themes too, notably Black Lives Matter. The disappointment, though, is that while most of the songs in this category – ‘Show Me’, ‘Indian Givers’, ‘Terrorist Suicide Hang Gliders’ – have great potential, most are not sufficiently well realised to make their point as forcefully as they might. And in some cases, the presentation is more than a little approximate. ‘Texas Rangers’ being the worst offender in this category. Only ‘John Oaks’ really matches the title track for its compelling mixture of the message and the music. And then there are the tracks that don’t quite fit. ‘Glass Accident’ is strange. The melody sounds eerily like ‘Sail Away’, but the subject matter is more personal than anything else on the album. It’s a good song, but one that belongs in a different place. As for the closing track, ‘My New Robot’, this could have been a sort of protest song too, providing a sense of the anomie of modern-day living. However, with its Trans-era Vocoder sound, it just doesn’t deliver. Peace Trail is a deceptively simple album. It may include only one great song, but it’s well worth a listen. And as a commentary on Trump-era America, indeed contemporary life pretty much everywhere, it has a serious point to make. And that can’t be said of every new album, never mind one from a 71-year-old Canadian.

 

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