Trummors – Headlands

Trummors – Headlands

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Trummors are Anne Cunningham and Dave Lerner, himself formerly of Ted Leo & the Pharmacists. Originally working out of New York, they’re now based in New Mexico. And they seem well at home there. Headlands is a mix of folky ballads, desert drone, and Topanga Canyon-era sounds. There’s also a cover of the Ian Matthew’s 1971 classic, ‘Hearts’. ‘L.A. River’ and ‘Hollis Tornado’ stand out, while ‘Breezin” is yet another candidate for the best song that Neil Young never wrote. To add to the mix, Anne Cunningham has a PhD in comparative literature, ensuring that there’s some method in the madness. This is Trummors’ third album. Rumours are that Headlands is their best. They’re right.

Eric & Magill – Peach Colored Oranges

Eric & Magill – Peach Colored Oranges

Eric & McGill - Peach Colored Oranges

Happy to recommend the new album by Eric & Magill.  With all the tracks coming in at under three minutes, Peach Colored Oranges is a lovely collection of dream pop vignettes. Inspired by travel, the songs communicate more a sense of space than location.  In their bio, Eric and Magill reference influences such as Nick Drake, Beach House, Mojave 3, and Neil Young. But discerning listeners might also hear echoes of Sufjan Stevens in quiet mode as well as their near homonyms, Lewis & Clarke. Highlights include ‘Tightrope’ and ‘A Softer Sound’. Peach Colored Oranges is available over at Bandcamp.

John Statz – The Fire Sermon

John Statz – The Fire Sermon

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Really pleased to announce that John Statz’s new album, The Fire Sermon, is now available worldwide. Funded by a Kickstarter campaign, it follows his 2015 release, Tulsa, which was lovingly reviewed here. The two albums are wonderfully complementary. Strong on narrative, big on melody, they make you feel slightly wistful at the same time as they get your toes a-tapping. The vistas are huge. There are plenty of references to his beloved Colorado. But the stories are always local. People look back at the past, reflecting on what happened, and without necessarily being able to explain why. The opening track, ‘Cashmere’, sets the scene, with the full band playing impeccably.  A particular favourite, though, is ‘With Some Horses’, which could have been written by none other than Willy Vlautin. There’s also a cover of a Caitlin Harnett song, ‘Bad Man’, which provides a really nice take on the original. Disappointed to have missed him by only a day in both Bray and Nottingham on his recent European tour, but hoping to catch up next time and looking forward to more releases. The Fire Sermon is highly recommended.