This is a time of looking forward. To the familiar artists that will return. To the new artists that will be discovered. This year, like any other, comes with a wish list. Some albums will never materialise. Others will slightly disappoint. A few will remain life-long friends. Fingers crossed for the latter. In no particular order, apart from alphabetical, my 2018 wish list includes new releases by Alela Diane, Anäis Mitchell, Bill Callahan, Caitlin Harnett, Cat Power, East River Pipe, Field Report, First Aid Kit, Jacob Golden, Jenny Lewis, Jessica Pratt, Jim White, Jonathan Wilson, Laura Veirs, Lewis & Clarke, Pearl Charles, Phosphorescent, Pinegrove, Richard Edwards, The Delines, Vetiver, Wooden Shjips, Wye Oak and the artist formerly known as Young Man.

And yet, there is a special place in the 2018 wish list for a new album by Kramies (pronunciation to be determined). With rumours going back at least a couple of decades, there are unconfirmed reports that an album is finally on its way and that Ireland had some part to play in it. We wait with fingers crossed, though we have learned not to hold our breath. The hard way. In the meantime, here’s a wonderful feature by Shon Cobbs and his Behind The Scenes colleagues from Denver. It features Kramies answering questions and sometimes asking them too. Plus a lot of laughing.

David Bowie – Blackstar

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It’s difficult to separate the music from the loss, but what a way to bow out. It’s worth adding ‘No Plan’ from the Lazarus soundtrack to the playlist.

Bat For Lashes – The Bride

Bat For Lashes - The Bride

The Bride is an exhausting but exhilarating journey into the restless imagination of Natasha Khan. The songs may be full of elemental imagery, but the tone is quiet.

Wye Oak – Tween

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Outtakes from their last two albums presented as a new offering. It’s not the most promising start, but this collection shines nonetheless.

Kevin Morby – Singing Saw

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When the actual singing saw kicks in, you start to run for cover. It seems like it’s really out to get you.

Band of Horses – Why Are You OK

Why Are You OK

Deceptively casual. Behind the seemingly good-time songs, demons were lurking. It wasn’t a confessional album, but it was more than just the soundtrack to a house party.