With the spring equinox just passed, here are some of the best releases of the year so far

The Delines – The Imperial

delines

If listening to sad songs could heal your own sadness, then Amy Boone, Willy Vlautin and the rest of The Delines would put the counsellors of the world out of business. Because The Imperial is packed full of very sad songs.

Cass McCombs – Tip of the Sphere

Cass

Another bunch of quirky songs from Cass McCombs. The artist who walks you right up to the threshold of a memorable melody only to reach over and ring the bell of the slightly grumpy neighbours next door. Frustrating at times, but features some really great bass lines.

Deerhunter – Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared?

Deerhunter

There’s a typically eclectic feel to the new Deerhunter album. On ‘Greenpoint Gothic’, for example, Gary Numan is surely in the house. For the most part, though, this is a fine bunch of exciting indie riffs for guitar and keyboards. Oh heaven. ‘Element’ is a particular highlight in the earworm department and it’s a great song to drive to.

Hand Habits – Placeholder

HH

Don’t be fooled by the slightly shy-sounding vocals. There’s plenty of power to the songs on Meg Duffy’s second solo album. Most are about relationships of different types and, typically, there’s a sadness to the outcomes. There, though, the similarity with The Delines ends.

 

2017. It felt like a lifetime. Roll on 2018. In the meantime, here are five of my favourite albums of the year.

The Weather Station

TWS

There are elements to Tamara Lindeman’s fourth album that bear comparison with her fellow Canadian Joni Mitchell. The music is folky, but the themes are complex. And so too are some of the song structures. It could have ended up a wilfully challenging listen. But a string of lovely melodies keeps everything nicely in balance.

Michael Nau – Some Twist

MN

Formerly of Cotton Jones, this is Michael Nau’s second solo album. It’s a collection of late-night wonders. So, if you’re feeling slightly woozy and liminality is fast approaching, then Some Twist is the perfect companion. Rest assured that it can be enjoyed at other times of the day too.

Kacey Johansing – The Hiding

KJ

The cover may suggest a concept album about the perils of getting up slightly too early in the morning. But the songs are confident, strong, and far from dishevelled. Made with the help of members of Real Estate and Vetiver, The Hiding is a collection of sublime pop songs. If they make you think of mid-1970s Christine McVie, you wouldn’t be far off.

Hand Habits – Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void)

HH

Hand Habits is Meg Duffy, who is originally from upstate New York. Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void) is a beautiful album, which is full of gentle songs with lovely melodies. But don’t be fooled, though. There’s a determination to this set. “I don’t need to be set free. I already know”.

Richard Edwards – Lemon Cotton Candy Sunset

RE

May Margot and [Her] Nuclear So and So’s Rest In Peace. But arise Richard Edwards.  Always the guiding force behind the greatest-band-that-never-quite-was, this is the first solo album from the Margot’s front man. Turns out, though, it’s a Margots album in all but name. O happy day.