Japanese Breakfast – Soft Sounds from Another Planet

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I couldn’t stop listening to the Soft Sounds of Japanese Breakfast over the summer. Expecting some wonderfully Proustian moments in years to come.

Dan Michaelson – First Light

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Dan Michaelson’s first solo album was built around a plaintive piano. His second features a string section. Plaintively, of course. With the sound perfectly complementing the sentiment, “Don’t dwell on old kisses you’ll always regret”, First Light is scarcely a blast of Christmas cheer. But released only a few days ago, it proves there really is a Sanity Clause.

Frontier Ruckus – Enter The Kingdom

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Sounding like songs of innocence, these were more like songs of a certain type of suburban experience. “Everyone’s home in sweatpants for the series finale of their discontinued fall prime time”. For sure, the neighbours may be slightly passive-aggressive, “And if I am not mistaken, You still owe me, 27 dollars”, but the air is thick with tender melodies and exotic instrumentation.

Widowspeak – Expect The Best

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There’s a density to the sound of Widowspeak, but there’s also a sensitivity to melody that keeps the tunes in your head long after the record has stopped.

Robyn Hitchcock

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Sparky riffs. Erudite lyrics. Robyn Hitchcock rolled back the years and delivered one of his finest albums in years. Meanwhile, therapists are still pouring over the lyrics. “I’m naked in the water, In the amniotic sea, Inside my real mother, She opens up for me”. Oh boy.

Widowspeak – Expect The Best

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Four years ago, Widowspeak released an EP called The Swamps. There was a wonderful onomatopoeic quality to the music. It was sweaty and sultry, and listening to it generated a certain sense of foreboding. There isn’t the same onomatopoeic element to Expect The Best, but Molly Hamilton, the singer and lead song-writer, certainly knows how to evoke a mood. Written in the Pacific Northwest, it’s sometimes disorientating, like being lost in an seemingly endless forest of trees. And perhaps there’s more to it than a simple simile. The music is built around Hamilton’s vocals, which have a certain slightly breathy, Hope Sandoval, 90s dream-pop aspect to them. It means that the dynamic range is deliberately diminished, as if the sound is being at least partly soaked up by an immense dark green mossy floor. The result is Widowspeak’s most rewarding album to date. Whereas the rocky peaks could have been elevated as high as Mount Rainier on Expect The Best, here they’re reduced to the level of Mount Formidable. Still magnificent, but not overwhelming. And well worth the trip.